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Smokey
10-17-2008, 07:31 PM
What was the first album you bought??

Although my mind get foggy going back twenty some odd years, but I think my first album was Joe Cocker's Greatest Hits in summer of 1980.

http://images.amazon.com/images/P/B000002GC9.01.LZZZZZZZ.jpg

elapsed
10-17-2008, 09:12 PM
First casette tape was back in elementary school.. Brian Adams, Into the Fire... and my first CD was a Beach Boys compilation album sometime in the late 80's or early 90's. First LP was purchased last year, Amy Winehouse, Back to Black.

cheers,
elapsed

Rich-n-Texas
10-17-2008, 10:40 PM
http://i115.photobucket.com/albums/n286/rich3fan/YesAlbum.jpg

I played this album on my family's first record player, which I eventually claimed as my own. :yesnod: I still have this album purchased when new.

RoadRunner6
10-17-2008, 11:12 PM
I was in Vietnam in 1969. I had just bought my first turntable, a Dual 1019. I got my first album at the Army PX. Blues From Laurel Canyon by British blues legend John Mayall. I loved it and still have it and play it sometimes.

RR6 :8:

3-LockBox
10-18-2008, 01:10 AM
I think we've had this question a couple of times over the years, and I may have answered it different both times. I was given a bunch of albums by my brother, so its kinda a blur anyway, but I think my first album purchase was Steve Miller Band's Greatest Hits. Or it coulda been Against The Wind by Bob Seger...maybe...

thekid
10-18-2008, 03:45 AM
Well being the cheap bast#@# that I my early albums were given to me or I borrowed other people's and made tapes. However the first album I bought (still have it) was Jackson Browne's "Running on Empty" never have tired of it in 30+ years.......

thekid
10-18-2008, 03:50 AM
I was in Vietnam in 1969. I had just bought my first turntable, a Dual 1019. I got my first album at the Army PX. Blues From Laurel Canyon by British blues legend John Mayall. I loved it and still have it and play it sometimes.

RR6 :8:

Those Dual 1019's must have been a bargain at the PX back then because my Dad bought his around the same time when he was there in 67-68. I have talked to a few other "audio vets" who mentioned picking up 1019's during that era while in Vietnam. I inherited my Dad's a few years back and it is built like a tank and keeps on spinning..... :)

Feanor
10-18-2008, 05:28 AM
What was the first album you bought??

...

I really don't remember. Actually I was a bit of a late starter musically. And I didn't own any play back equipment until after I left college; my first equipment was a Sony cassette player bought around 1970. I bought some precorded cassettes but these are long gone.

My first LPs came in '70 or '71. I don't remember what they were, but I was into Folk. My first might have been one these Baez or perhaps a Gordon Lightfoot; (these days I gag at the thought of listening to anything Lightfoot). I still have these LPs though I doubt I've listened to the vinyl in 20 years.
...

02audionoob
10-18-2008, 05:59 AM
I wish I could have been cool, but alas...my first album purchase was Have You Never Been Mellow by Olivia Newton-John.

http://www.olivia-newtonjohn.com/images/db/album/have-you-never-been-mellow-a.jpg

ForeverAutumn
10-18-2008, 09:02 AM
I had a bunch of kiddie albums that my parents bought me...Captain Kangaroo and other such stuff. But my first real rock album purchased with my own money was Bowie's Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars. I think that I was around 12. For some reason it was in the delete bin, cheap and I liked the album cover so I bought it. I barely even knew who David Bowie was. It changed my life.

jonnyhambone
10-18-2008, 02:59 PM
I remember going to a record store with my Dad and him saying that my sis. and I could each pick 2. I got Billy Joel 'The Stranger' and Queen's 'Flash Gordon' soundtrack. My sis. got Village People and somethin' else.
My first cd was John Mayall 'The Turning Point'...didn't get a cd player for about a year after that and, man, did it sound good after that year of build-up. Actually, I need to give that a spin tonight...amazing album. I'll probably not be spinnin' Flash Gordon again anytime soon.

<object width="425" height="344"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/uh8KVG8j68I&hl=en&fs=1"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/uh8KVG8j68I&hl=en&fs=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" width="425" height="344"></embed></object>

Styx
10-18-2008, 04:26 PM
Queen II was my 1st album......I still have it and I wore it out that for sure. The cd sounds a lot cleaner.:lol:

Mr Peabody
10-18-2008, 04:35 PM
Technically I guess the first album I remember buying was Cream, Goodbye, which I got at a yard sale. I was either in 5th or 6th grade and only had one of those suitcase style record players. I really wasn't that cool so young, I only knew Cream by name but thought I was when I played that and had my green light bulb in, gotta love them 70's man. I believe my first virgin vinyl from a store nicely sealed was a few years down the road and it was either Jeff Beck's, Wired or ZZ Top, Fandango. I got them both around the same time. I still have that Fandango album but unloaded the Jeff Beck and bought it on the new amazing format called CD a while after it rolled out. My first CD was Prince, Purple Rain which the guy gave me when I bought my first CD player.

musicman1999
10-18-2008, 06:24 PM
Mine was the Birds, the Bees and the Monkees in the summer of 1968. The start of a 40 year love affair with music.


bill

opt80
10-18-2008, 06:36 PM
A K-Tel album with the theme from Batman(tv series) It was 1965,I was 9yrs old. I played that LP everyday that summer.

Alan

opt80
10-18-2008, 06:38 PM
Mine was the Birds, the Bees and the Monkees in the summer of 1968. The start of a 40 year love affair with music.


bill
Hey Bill, Nice system.

Smokey
10-18-2008, 08:34 PM
Thanks everyone. It is fun reading everybodyís story about their first adventure into buying albums.

I think for most of us who donít remember for sure the exact first album bought might be that we may have inherited alot of albums from a family member, and donít remember whether we bought or inherited it :D

RoadRunner6
10-18-2008, 09:47 PM
Jonnyhambone, I've got the Mayall The Turning Point LP album also. He is amazing and still performing at age 75 !!!

http://www.johnmayall.com/home.html

Mr. Peabody, I've also got the Goodbye album by Cream (I'm So Glad). My favorite Cream tune ever is their cover of Crossroads. I can play my CD copy set to repeat and listen to that song all day!

Other artists who have covered the song Cross Road Blues (Crossroads):

The Doors during their 1970 Live in Detroit Concert/CD
Cowboy Junkies
Dion on Bronx in Blue 2006
Free (live)
Elmore James
Lynyrd Skynyrd (live)
Rush
Ten Years After
The Allman Joys
The Hamsters
Van Halen (live)
Steve Miller Band (live)
Molly Hatchet (live)
Smak (live)
Stephen Stills (Indiana University's Assembly Hall, Indiana, USA - 19 October 1972)
Jeff Berlin on Pump It 1986
Page & Plant (live)


Lots of good memories in these posts. Thanks Smokey.

RR6 :9:

Mr Peabody
10-18-2008, 10:41 PM
I think my favorite Cream is still White Room. I still have a vinyl copy of Steel Wheels with Cross Roads.

Good to see you MM1999, I think it's been a while. The shop here in town I deal with the most picked up Anthem recently. They have the Statement gear on display, I'm going to have to get in there. Not that I could afford that but I'd like to hear it. They also had a Boulder pre and power amp to try. I didn't know it and they had to send the preamp back. They still have the amp and say they should get the preamp back some time in the future. I think they said the amp was like $22k. Boulder is supposed to be theee shtuff though. Like there's a lot of ultra expensive gear out there but Boulder is the stuff that could blow the theory of diminishing returns. I'll hopefully hear some day.

Have you ever noticed how many excellent classic albums were released in 1969? That seems to be a stand out year for R&R.

Auricauricle
10-19-2008, 02:35 PM
First album (LP): Dark Side of the Moon
First CD: Synchronicity

Been down hill since....Thank God!

BradH
10-19-2008, 03:49 PM
The first one was The Beatles' Magical Mystery Tour in about 1972. I remember I was eleven and for some reason I made a cone out of a sheet of paper, stuck a sewing needle through the narrow end and held it on the record to see if it would play. It did! Then my mom came in and told me to stop because it was bad for the record.

My first piece of hi-fi advice. Thanks, Mom!

I still have that record but it sounds hammered for some reason.

Auricauricle
10-19-2008, 05:00 PM
Genius is seldom recognized until it's too late....

Sounds like your mom was astute enough to know better!

emesbee
10-19-2008, 07:51 PM
My first LP was the Beatles "Sgt Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band" (what else?). I bought it in 1970 when I was 15 years old, and I still have it (it has the foldout sleeve with the photo of the Beatles in their Sgt Pepper uniforms, and the Sgt Pepper cutouts).

Mr MidFi
10-20-2008, 05:41 AM
I had a few albums back when I was a kid, but they were mostly passing childish impulse gimme-gimmes, not worth mentioning.

But I distinctly recall a day back in 1975 when my brother and I decided we were going to be music fans and resolved to pool our allowance resources for the purpose of buying record albums. The first disc we got was Emerson, Lake & Palmer's Pictures at an Exhibition...followed shortly by The Eagles Great Hits. Led Zeppelin Presence and Aerosmith's first album weren't long after that.

RoadRunner6
10-20-2008, 05:51 AM
Emesbee, your signature: "All we are saying, is give peas a chance" reminds me of a bumper sticker I have seen up here in the States:

"Visualize Whirled Peas"

RR6 :thumbsup:

kexodusc
10-20-2008, 06:25 AM
Yeah, like some others I had a bunch of kiddie records and crap my folks bought me. But my first album, the reward for mowing lawns for cash, was none other than....

:7:



http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/d/d2/N.W.A.StraightOuttaComptonalbumcover.jpg


Yeaah...%$@# tha Police.

GMichael
10-20-2008, 06:26 AM
The first 45 I bought was The Beatles - I Saw Her Standing There.
The first 8-track I ever bought myself was Queen - A night at the Opera. After that I picked up a bunch of Aerosmith, Led Zeppelin, Ted Nugent, Boston, Cheap Trick, Yes, Pink Floyd, Alice Cooper, ELO, ELP, etc. Also made a ton of recordings off the radio onto cassette.
The first record was Rush 2112. Then, a whole lot more Rush.

Ex Lion Tamer
10-20-2008, 07:40 AM
Here's mine...

http://image.allmusic.com/00/amg/cov200/drc800/c804/c804554j1t1.jpg

Went to the store - A&A Records on Ste. Catherine St. in Montreal to buy EJ's "Don't Shoot Me I'm Only the Piano Player", but they were out of stock, but dag nab it I was determined to buy something.

Feanor
10-20-2008, 08:54 AM
The first 45 I bought was The Beatles - I Saw Her Standing There.
The first 8-track I ever bought myself was Queen - A night at the Opera. After that I picked up a bunch of Aerosmith, Led Zeppelin, Ted Nugent, Boston, Cheap Trick, Yes, Pink Floyd, Alice Cooper, ELO, ELP, etc. Also made a ton of recordings off the radio onto cassette.
The first record was Rush 2112. Then, a whole lot more Rush.

If there was ever a POS technology it had to be 8-track. I managed to avoided it on advice from a wise engineer acquaintance who assured me casstte was the better technlogy. Haha! Beta was also the better techlology so I bought that: can't win 'em all.

So my very first sound, (I hesitate to say hifi), compenent was a Sony cassette deck as mentiond. Come to think of it one of the first, perhaps the first pre-recorded cassette I bought was "Switched on Bach" by Wendy (then still Walter) Carlos.

When soon after I got my first TT, one of my earlest LPs was Carlos' "Well Tempered Synthesizer"
...

Swish
10-20-2008, 09:02 AM
...Jethro Tull's 'Aqualung' or Bloodrock III. I bought a number of 45s prior to those two LPs, but they wouldn't count.

Swish

ForeverAutumn
10-20-2008, 10:05 AM
If there was ever a POS technology it had to be 8-track. I managed to avoided it on advice from a wise engineer acquaintance who assured me casstte was the better technlogy. Haha! Beta was also the better techlology so I bought that: can't win 'em all.

So my very first sound, (I hesitate to say hifi), compenent was a Sony cassette deck as mentiond. Come to think of it one of the first, perhaps the first pre-recorded cassette I bought was "Switched on Bach" by Wendy (then still Walter) Carlos.

When soon after I got my first TT, one of my earlest LPs was Carlos' "Well Tempered Synthesizer"
...

I remember being a kid and my older cousin bought a new something or other and gave me his old 8-track player and a stack of tapes. I remember some of the tapes were ELO's Out of the Blue, Elton John's Good-bye Yellow Brick Road, and Supertramp's Crime of the Century. There were others but those are the ones that I specifically remember. I think that I played the ELO tape until I wore it out. I don't remember what happened to that old 8-track. It probably broke and I threw it out. But those old tapes were a big influence on me. I had completely forgotten about that until just now. Thanks for the memory jolt Feanor. I should call my cousin and thank him! :14:

ForeverAutumn
10-20-2008, 10:07 AM
...Jethro Tull's 'Aqualung' or Bloodrock III. I bought a number of 45s prior to those two LPs, but they wouldn't count.

Swish

Excuse me while I shake my head and clear my brain from the disbelief. You bought a Jethro Tull album?!!!! :eek6:

Javier
10-20-2008, 01:51 PM
i®ll play I do not recall properly but it was Three dog night live or the bee gees best vol 1, ah the memories

Javier
10-20-2008, 02:02 PM
speaking of memories also recall putting records on lay-away at the penny store ( Maclelans or kress) I had a whole month to pick them so a buck a week ( 4-5 dlls single albums 8-12 doubles ) back in early 70ī.

musicman1999
10-20-2008, 04:27 PM
Have you ever noticed how many excellent classic albums were released in 1969? That seems to be a stand out year for R&R.

Hey mr p, my friend you are right 1969 was a great year for music.

bill

Auricauricle
10-20-2008, 05:41 PM
Fean: Something I found a while back....I'm a big fan....

Oh, yeah....

bobsticks
10-20-2008, 05:49 PM
What's this thing you call..."album"?

Mr Peabody
10-20-2008, 06:54 PM
Wow, some good ole R&R staples being mentioned here, 2112, Toys In The Attic & Crime of the Century, all still favorite albums that score a #10 with me.

Smokey
10-20-2008, 08:13 PM
Did somebody mentioned 8-track tapes? Those were fun. In a party, you could stick a tape in a player and it played all night long unattended.


Yeah, like some others I had a bunch of kiddie records and crap my folks bought me. But my first album, the reward for mowing lawns for cash, was none other than....

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/d/d2/N.W.A.StraightOuttaComptonalbumcover.jpg



I bet your parents were thrilled to have such a album playing in their house that talk about Ho's, gangbangs, driveby, drugs and killing police :D

GMichael
10-21-2008, 05:35 AM
Did somebody mentioned 8-track tapes? Those were fun. In a party, you could stick a tape in a player and it played all night long unattended.
:D

Not to mention, hear more than one song at a time.:idea:

Mr Peabody
10-21-2008, 08:51 PM
You could actually hear more than one song at a time from an 8-track? Whoo.... I thought that was a side effect.....

Smokey
10-21-2008, 09:42 PM
You could actually hear more than one song at a time from an 8-track? Whoo.... I thought that was a side effect.....

Despite all of 8-track shortcomings, must admit that when it worked it sounded pretty good. At least much better than cassette tapes.

Gerall
10-23-2008, 01:01 PM
Was a long time ago, but one of the first was the original first pressing of Woodstock. It is the three album set with the red centers on the vinyl. Side one is opposite side six, two opposite five, and three opposite four. It worked great on our old console as you could stack em, play 1,2,3 then flip em all over and play 4,5,6. I have yet to see anyone with the same albums. All the others I have seen have 1,2-3.4-5.6 and have a light bluish pattern on the centers. I remember it was when I joined the Columbia record club and had like five free ones. I remember getting Woodstock, CSNY Deja Vu, one Who album. The others escape me. Since then I have upwards of 2000 albums. Just last week I went to a local mall where they had donated vinyl on for a buck each. Found a few diamonds in the rough, a signed copy from BJ Thomas 1969 greatest hits vol1, and a signed copy of a Gary&Sandy album. Spent 3 hours going thru them and got over 100 in pristine condition, many replacing my albums from the 60's 70's. Those years weren't kind to my vinyl.:wink5:

One of my prized collections is I have a pristine versions of Black Sabbath, Paranoid, in 8 track, casette, vinyl, and CD formats.

GMichael
10-23-2008, 01:11 PM
You could actually hear more than one song at a time from an 8-track? Whoo.... I thought that was a side effect.....

It was. You'd have to adjust the matchbook cover, that was stuffed under the tape, to get just the one song to play right.

Gerall
10-23-2008, 01:20 PM
LOL...that famous book of matches wedge has to be remembered by all the 60's 8 trackies. On my first car I put an 8 track just below the ash tray assembly and found that I could get a cut off plastic tweaker screwdriver in there and adjust the head alignment without yarding out the whole unit. That was, of course, after you took the top off the player and got rid of that red goop they used to keep you from aligning it yourself.

emesbee
10-23-2008, 04:56 PM
Despite all of 8-track shortcomings, must admit that when it worked it sounded pretty good. At least much better than cassette tapes.

Audio cassettes were never intended for hi-fi sound reproduction when they were designed. I think they were meant for things like dictation machines. All the noise reduction methods that came later could never really overcome the inherent limitations of the medium.

emesbee
10-23-2008, 05:22 PM
Not to mention, hear more than one song at a time.:idea:

Please correct me if I'm wrong, but I think 8 track recordings were a continuous loop, and had the same thing recorded on different tracks with different start points. You could instantly jump from one part of the recording to another by switching tracks.

The only experience I have with an 8 track player was playing around with one in a minibus when I was 16, back in 1972. It was a Rolling Stones greatest hits collection.

audiobill
10-23-2008, 05:26 PM
Audio cassettes were never intended for hi-fi sound reproduction when they were designed. I think they were meant for things like dictation machines. All the noise reduction methods that came later could never really overcome the inherent limitations of the medium.

Hey emesbee,


One could apply your apt observation to mp3s. If we were to insert "mp3s" for "Audio cassettes" your post would read equally well:

(mp3s) were never intended for hi-fi sound reproduction when they were designed. I think they were meant for things like dictation machines. All the noise reduction methods that came later could never really overcome the inherent limitations of the medium.

But they are awfully convenient.

Cheers,
Bill

Mr Peabody
10-23-2008, 06:21 PM
It was. You'd have to adjust the matchbook cover, that was stuffed under the tape, to get just the one song to play right.


* That's not quite the side effects I was talking about, more like effects of recreational activities at the time.

"How's my drivin'...... m-a-n?" "Uh....... man.... I think we're parked... man" "Ah... really"

02audionoob
10-23-2008, 06:47 PM
Please correct me if I'm wrong, but I think 8 track recordings were a continuous loop, and had the same thing recorded on different tracks with different start points. You could instantly jump from one part of the recording to another by switching tracks.

The only experience I have with an 8 track player was playing around with one in a minibus when I was 16, back in 1972. It was a Rolling Stones greatest hits collection.

8-track was indeed a continuous loop, but the same thing was not recorded on different tracks. Four two-channel programs were recorded in parallel on the looped tape...thus 8 tracks. Changing from one channel to the next caused the player to move to a different area on the width of the tape.

Mr Peabody
10-23-2008, 06:47 PM
Come on, no one really thinks 8-tracks sounded better than cassettes do you? With a high bias cassette recorded on a good deck and good source the sound was pretty good. 8-track never came close to that. Well, just comparing pre-recorded they both pretty much sucked. I can honestly say I never bought a new pre-recorded cassette. Or, 8-track as far as that goes.

There was a difference between decks too. I started with a Technics and replaced it with a Teac, The Teac was quite a bit better. I think the key to good sound from cassettes was head alignment. Something I knew nothing about. I trusted the decks to all be standard. I dropped some tapes I recorded into a Nakamichi deck and they didn't sound as good as they did on my Teac. But the Nak was a better machine and sounded better on standard tapes and tapes rrecorded from it in the first place.

My daughter's boyfriend has an I-pod, one with 80 GB. I asked him to check it out. The first time I actually played with an I-pod. I have a couple small mp3 players but not an Apple product. He was just using the ear buds that came with the I-pod. I plugged my portable Sennheiser's in for him to enlighten him a bit. I was actually impressed by the sound of this I-pod, I mean in comparison to mp3 sound I had heard before. He ripped most of his stuff from I-tunes and I expected it to sound compressed and crappy. His I-pod had a wider sound stage than my Sandisk and more of a high fidelity sound. They must do a good job with AAC. It also had more volume than I could stand. I say this because we criticize kids today for liking mp3 sound but with good headphones it probably sounds better than anything they've heard before unless some one they know has a high end system and that's not a majority. I have to say it's a far cry better than most of the car audio systems these kids think sound good.

emesbee
10-23-2008, 07:42 PM
8-track was indeed a continuous loop, but the same thing was not recorded on different tracks. Four two-channel programs were recorded in parallel on the looped tape...thus 8 tracks. Changing from one channel to the next caused the player to move to a different area on the width of the tape.

I stand corrected. So if each pair of tracks contained a different part of an album, skipping tracks would give the illusion of direct access to another part of the recording.

emesbee
10-23-2008, 07:54 PM
Mr Peabody, I don't disagree with your comments regarding 8-tracks and cassettes. Towards the end, it certainly was possible to get good sound quality from a cassette. However, that was only after there had been years of development with noise reduction systems, different tape materials, improvements in the design of tape decks, etc, etc. I have a reasonable quality cassette deck myself, and sometimes I am quite surprised at how good it can sound. However, no matter how good the noise reduction, there is always a residual amount of tape hiss present.

I suspect that if the same amount of development effort had been put into 8-track, then it would probably surpass cassette in terms of sound quality, but the medium disappeared before that could happen.

I would think, though, that when the two formats were introduced (I'm not sure which came first) that 8-track probably did sound better then, before the later developments with cassettes.

Smokey
10-23-2008, 08:08 PM
I would think, though, that when the two formats were introduced (I'm not sure which came first) that 8-track probably did sound better then, before the later developments with cassettes.

I think 8-track sounded better because its speed was twice cassette tapes. Higher tape speed mean higher bandwidth and lower noise :)

elapsed
10-23-2008, 08:35 PM
Audio cassettes were never intended for hi-fi sound reproduction when they were designed. I think they were meant for things like dictation machines. All the noise reduction methods that came later could never really overcome the inherent limitations of the medium.
Then you've never auditioned a Nakamichi CR-7E, the finest cassette deck ever made. Cost around $2,000 back in 1998, can still blow away many CD players.

http://www.hi-fiworld.co.uk/hfw/oldeworldehtml/nakamichicr7e.html

cheers,
elapsed

02audionoob
10-23-2008, 08:49 PM
My Sony K909ES cassette deck sounds very nice...perhaps not what some would call high-fidelity...but still good.

emesbee
10-23-2008, 09:14 PM
Then you've never auditioned a Nakamichi CR-7E, the finest cassette deck ever made. Cost around $2,000 back in 1998, can still blow away many CD players.

http://www.hi-fiworld.co.uk/hfw/oldeworldehtml/nakamichicr7e.html

cheers,
elapsed

I don't disagree. I did listen to a Nakamichi cassette deck around the time you mention (1998), so may well have heard the model you mention. (I wasn't auditioning, it was at a hi-fi show).

Equally, there are some very fine CD players around, a number of which I am sure would blow away the Nakamichi deck you mention.

TheRambler
10-28-2008, 02:59 AM
Some British rock, Uriah Heep albums in early 70's..
Also many 45s, Still remember: The night chicago died, Paper Lace, was it ?:12:

TheRambler
10-28-2008, 03:11 AM
After using so many cassette decks (cant remember, around a hundred), top-quality ones including Nak ZX-7 and ZX-9 (Mr Nakamichi's most liked deck), Dragons, RX-505s, Luxman K-05, Sony-777ES, and so many top-end brands I can say one thing. I'm still listening this media in my car only. In terms of analog, as a recorded media I finally reached to Nirvana.. It is DAT..Go for a DAT machine forget anything said on them whether they have limitations with 48khz etc etc, it is non-sense, get recording either from your vinyl or from digital source and get deeply shocked with the sound quality. I do suggest DAT machines as a (still) analog recording media (forget the first letter "D") standing for Digital, as it has nothing to the with digital , get the most still from the analog. Dithering, Super Bit Mapping (SPM) as used by many Sony recording laboratories and as well by Telarc. Second generation dublications are terminated with DAT machines (in digital input/output) as they are really make "clone" recoding, but analog highway still there for those analog music lovers. Stay in peace.:12:

Mr Peabody
10-28-2008, 05:44 PM
Ah, Demons & Wizards, I still love that album. Welcome to AR Rambler

Brick Top
10-30-2008, 05:32 AM
well....some people may know of Sam The Record Man in Ontario. Back in about 74 they used to give away a certain LP on a Sat morn for 1 penny to the first 50 customers or so. I stood in line real early on a Sat morn in 74 to get a Lighthouse LP. Can't remember the name of it though. But the price was right...for a 14 year old kid...and I didn't even own a Turntable.

Cheers,
BT

ForeverAutumn
10-30-2008, 05:49 AM
well....some people may know of Sam The Record Man in Ontario. Back in about 74 they used to give away a certain LP on a Sat morn for 1 penny to the first 50 customers or so. I stood in line real early on a Sat morn in 74 to get a Lighthouse LP. Can't remember the name of it though. But the price was right...for a 14 year old kid...and I didn't even own a Turntable.

Cheers,
BT

Hey Brick Top, where you from? I grew up with Sam the Record Man (not literally with Sam, I'm not that old. lol) and A&A's next door. I remember getting up really early on boxing day, each year, and my Mom would take us downtown to line up in front of Sam's before they opened. We'd stand in line for hours, freezing our noses off. But back in those days the deals were worth it. It was a sad day for me when Sam's closed their doors for good. :(

BradH
10-30-2008, 09:35 PM
You'd have to adjust the matchbook cover, that was stuffed under the tape, to get just the one song to play right.

Omigod, the matchbooks. I'd almost forgotten about that. What a pain. The only saving grace was the matchbook was wedge shaped so you could keep cramming it in there. I remember one cartridge I had where the little metal piece fell off that tells the player to switch tracks so you had to do it manually.

I remember a lot of tape hiss associated with these things, far more than cassettes. Also, with the tape being pulled from the inner pack next to the reel they had to use cheap tapes to keep the cartridge from filling up with ferric oxide dust. They used to jack with the song sequencing too so there would be minimal track switches during a song, remember that? Then there were those really heavy ones made from double albums, they lasted about a week. Man, what a wave of suction those things were. I think half of them were bootlegs anyway judging by the freaky covers. We had receivers that would record to 8-tracks so I ended up with some cool FM stuff like an ad for Genesis on the Lamb tour. In 1989 I tried to transfer them to HiFi VHS using a standalone 8-track player but it ate the damned thing up. That's another memory, pulling wads of tape out of those machines.

Brick Top
10-31-2008, 08:47 AM
Hey Brick Top, where you from?


I lived in Hamilton , ON from 74 - 99. We had many good record stores in the old days. Now I live in a cow path in MI...and my best choice for a B&M store for media is Walfart!

I used to love going out on Boxing day and spendin a couple 100 bucks on records. No such fun in this neck of the woods.

Cheers,
BT