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Smokey
08-31-2008, 09:50 PM
Think the last thread I saw about favorite vocalist goes back to 04, so it might be time for another one which also include favorite female vocalist also. In the parentheses is the song that highlight their vocal talent.

Not in any particular order:

Ian Anderson of Jettru Tull (Velvet Green)
http://www.hdw-inc.com/iacolorbrnsuit.jpg

Natalie Merchant of 10,000 Maniacs (What's the Matter Here)
http://slog.thestranger.com/files/2008/05/afo_NatalieMerchant.jpg

Brad Delp of Boston (More than A Feeling)
http://www.boston.com/ae/music/blog/bradelp.jpg

Paul Rodgers of Bad Company (Shooting Star)
http://www.paradiseartists.com/artists/paul_rodgers/splash.jpg

Joan Armatrading (Drop the Pilot)
http://www.kalamu.com/bol/wp-content/content/images/joan%20armatrading%2015.jpg

Dio (Holy Diver)
http://i95.photobucket.com/albums/l142/duncanwilder/dio02.jpg

Stevie Wonder (Too High)
http://www.strictlysocial.com/journal/wp-content/uploads/2007/04/Stevie_Wonder.jpg

Jackson Brown (Hold Out)
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3051/2354873538_66cb947bac.jpg

Kate Bush (Running Up That Hill)
http://www.virginmedia.com/images/katebush_gal_431.jpg

David Gilmour of Pink Floyd (Wish You Were Here)
http://www.subirimagenes.com/imagenes/612444david.jpg

bobsticks
08-31-2008, 10:37 PM
Natalie, Stevie, RJD (though once Viv left things went downhill rapidly), and Gilmour FTW...

...everybody else can remain in obscurity. Jesus, the sight of Brad Delp in a Paul McCartney T-shirt is enough to make one shudder and convulse.

Smokey
08-31-2008, 11:29 PM
Man, you are hard to please :D And who is RJD?

Had a hard time with this list. Seems there is too much over lapping between great songs and great singers as sometimes they compilment each other and sometime they don't as great songs does not neccasry guaranty a great singer.

But all criticism aside, where is your list :rolleyes5:

Luvin Da Blues
09-01-2008, 05:30 AM
.........And who is RJD?


My guess would be Ronnie James Dio.

markw
09-01-2008, 05:49 AM
Either Robert Plant from Led Zep or Jon Anderson from Yes

Auricauricle
09-01-2008, 07:00 AM
Whattabout Roger Daltrey? Strength, intonation, phrasing, stamina....

bobsticks
09-01-2008, 01:39 PM
Eeeeaaasyy there Smo-kay. I'm not bangin' on yer thread on prinipal it's just that Classic Rock (and I assume you generally mean the 60's and 70's) isn't really my bag. I like a little more to the extremes...a little less or a little more growl, or as Sloshy would say my music should "hit the headboard".

But, I'll stand by the chosen few I've got already. I generally like John Kaye when I hear him. Ian Gillan too. I'm wrackin'my brain but frankly not much else makes my wheels spin.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v88/windupdoll/John_Kay_Steppenwolf.jpg http://www.rockaces.com/news/data/upimages/Gillan.bmp

3-LockBox
09-01-2008, 01:53 PM
I always like Steve Miller, just cuz a few of my friends thought I sounded like him back in the day (I'm not sayin, I'm just saying). In his early daze, he could have a powerful, bluesy voice, and then slip into that velvety Como voice he donned so often.

For pure gutteral power, I like Sammy Hagar (yer not just now makin the connection are you?) - he could do the heavy metal screetch, he could sing in a ballsy rock voice, he could show some control on the poppier stuff, and he had good range. Micheal Anthony said he lost a testicle trying to sing backup for him.

John Wetton had a unique tone, but also a lot of control and range. He went from interpreting Robert Fripp's wierdo lyrics in King Crimson, to singing pop prog in groups like UK and Asia. When you listen to listen to a whistful song like Book Of Saturdays from KC's Larks Tongues In Aspic ('73), where he sound's older than his years, to Heat Of The Moment w/ Asia ('82), where sounds like a young man belting a modern pop tune (of his day) you begin to appreciate that this guy, while not ever sounding impressive, always got the job done. He's one helluva bass player too, or Fripp woulda never messed with him.

bobsticks
09-01-2008, 01:58 PM
See, alot of these characters slipped into the Eightees. Is that now considered "Classic Rock" too?

ForeverAutumn
09-01-2008, 02:00 PM
Freddie Mercury.

3-LockBox
09-01-2008, 02:05 PM
I will say Dio has always been a personal fave of mine, so its a good call, but just incase anyone thought he was a just a heavy metal screamer:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6sn1UqbbbqQ&feature=related

MindGoneHaywire
09-01-2008, 02:14 PM
I think a couple of your choices (Kate Bush) might stretch the definition of the 'classic rock' radio format, Smokey, but that's okay. That definition needed expanding from the moment it rose from the ashes of Lee Abrams' AOR format that ruined rock music for a lot of us.

My choices would be both Elvises, Little Richard, John Lennon, Van Morrison, Marvin Gaye, Tom Waits, Joey Ramone, Mick Jagger, James Brown, Brian & Carl Wilson along with (F*CK) Mike Love, Sam Cooke, Phil Alvin, Neil Young, Stevie Wonder, Ian Curtis, Bob Dylan, Michael Jackson, & Exene.

bobsticks
09-01-2008, 02:35 PM
Now that's the list my addled mind should have come up with...and it's not worth picking nits between R&B and "Classic Rock" since even the timeline is vague. We should all probably be flogged for letting Autumn beat us to the punch with Freddie.

I guess I've always considered Ian Curtis and Tom Waits as having categories of their own.

Somehow,somewhere Bob Marley and Shane MacGowan must have a place at the table. Recent whiney Bono-esque politicisms aside, Sting got quite a back catalogue as well.

3-LockBox
09-01-2008, 02:56 PM
I guess I've always considered Ian Curtis and Tom Waits as having categories of their own.

Speaking of Ian Curtis, where is that movie, Control? Did it ever get a threatrical release?

jes wondern...I wasn't a true fan of Curis' Jim Morrison on downers vocal style, but you can't escape his influence if you liked this kind of meloncollie, beat music in the '80s.

MindGoneHaywire
09-01-2008, 03:00 PM
I think it got the arthouse treatment. It is out on DVD. I have it on my iPod but haven't watched it yet. Too busy arguing with Brad about the Allman Brothers.

Smokey
09-01-2008, 10:00 PM
For pure gutteral power, I like Sammy Hagar (yer not just now makin the connection are you?) - he could do the heavy metal screetch, he could sing in a ballsy rock voice, he could show some control on the poppier stuff, and he had good range. Micheal Anthony said he lost a testicle trying to sing backup for him.


I agree. he is probably the one that is was responsible for revitalization of Van Halen after David Lee Roth left. He gave renewed energy to that band which usually face away after a band been around a while. Too bad VH couldn't keep him.


I think a couple of your choices (Kate Bush) might stretch the definition of the 'classic rock' radio format, Smokey, but that's okay.
My choices would be both Elvises, Little Richard, John Lennon, Van Morrison, Marvin Gaye, Tom Waits, Joey Ramone, Mick Jagger, James Brown, Brian & Carl Wilson along with (F*CK) Mike Love, Sam Cooke, Phil Alvin, Neil Young, Stevie Wonder, Ian Curtis, Bob Dylan, Michael Jackson, & Exene.

Kate Bush along with Merchant probably belong to alternative format, but after 20 years and aging of listener, the formats tend to blend. Like the format once consider contemporary adult 20 years ago now is considered oldies format :)

I like your list except may be Bob Dylan. Sometimes he seem to just phone it in.

Ex Lion Tamer
09-02-2008, 04:13 AM
John Lennon
Joe Strummer
Ian McCulloch
Elvis Costello
Paul Weller
Mick Jagger

Rich-n-Texas
09-02-2008, 11:05 AM
Festus, had you asked me this question 30 years ago I would've said: Robert Plant, Greg Lake, Ian Anderson, Jon Anderson (maybe), Ann Wilson, Jim Morrison, David Gilmore.

I have a little trouble with the term "Classic Rock" though. I'm sure this is a classification created by the industry to prop up some of the Old Glory bands of a bygone era, and a way for the broadcast medium to create more radio stations that play Classic Rock, and thus increase revenue ( :rolleyes: ), but back in the day it was just plain ol' Rock-n-Roll.

Nevertheless, I'd say the person who's voice has remained distinctive as well as having transcended all generations of vocalists since the 60's & 70's is David Gilmore. My CD and concert DVD collection has become Pink Floyd top-heavy, and it's because I associate his voice with a LOT of the memories I have of the days when Rock-n-Roll was still fresh and and taking many forms.

(Please forward this note along to Nurse Ratchett so when it's time for me to take up residence with you at Happy Acres, she'll know what soothes this savage beast.) :biggrin5:

BradH
09-02-2008, 03:55 PM
Hey Smokey, that's Roy Harper singin' on "Wish You Were Here".

They should've stuck w/ Gilmour on that one, imo.

Smokey
09-02-2008, 08:54 PM
Lion Tamer, good call on Ian McCulloch of Echo & the Bunnymen. His vocal style is very unique. In the same catagory as Morrissy of the Smiths.



(Please forward this note along to Nurse Ratchett so when it's time for me to take up residence with you at Happy Acres, she'll know what soothes this savage beast.) :biggrin5:

Nurse Ratchett said to soothe your soul when you check in, she will play you Ricky Skaggs songs instead of Pink Floyds :ihih:


Hey Smokey, that's Roy Harper singin' on "Wish You Were Here".


Are you sure. According to Google, Roy Harper sung the lead on "Have a Cigar", not the title track on Wish You Were Here album.

Auricauricle
09-03-2008, 11:48 AM
Anybody mentioned Patrick Simmons?

BradH
09-03-2008, 02:39 PM
According to Google, Roy Harper sung the lead on "Have a Cigar", not the title track on Wish You Were Here album.

I slouch corrected. I always thought that was Waters on "Have A Cigar" for some reason.

I never bought that album and still don't own it on cd. Seemed like a big disappointment after DSotM. Boy, am I outnumbered by other Floyd fans on that or what?

Troy
09-03-2008, 03:48 PM
I slouch corrected. I always thought that was Waters on "Have A Cigar" for some reason.

I never bought that album (Wish You Were Here) and still don't own it on cd. Seemed like a big disappointment after DSotM. Boy, am I outnumbered by other Floyd fans on that or what?

Dang Brad, not much of a Floyd fan after all, eh? The parts they never play on the radio? They're the best parts. The older I get, WYWH is the Floyd album I find myself coming back to the most.

For purposes of this list I choose Geddy Lee.

3-LockBox
09-03-2008, 03:56 PM
WWYH is a great album. I'd rank it just behind DSoTM and on some days, I'd rank it higher. My fave PF albums are in this order:

DSoTM
WWYH
Meddle
Animals
Atom Heart Mother

The rest are tied for 6th. Geez Brad, yer not a Floyd fan?!?!

BradH
09-04-2008, 05:38 AM
Dang Brad, not much of a Floyd fan after all, eh?

Other than the forty-eight bootleg Floyd discs I own and all their MoFi cd's and ten Syd boots I guess you're right.

I've even heard the parts of WYWH they don't play on the radio.

What can I say? I thought it was a major letdown after DSotM. I didn't like the recording style or anything about it so I walked into the record store and bought Kraftwerk's Radioacivity instead. I remember my buddies told me I was crazy.

So Troy, speaking of loyalty oaths, are you not a Yes fan because you don't like Topographic Oceans?

GMichael
09-04-2008, 12:04 PM
Saw Dio with Black Sabbath years ago. That man had a strong voice.
Pat Benatar was no slouch eaither. That little girl had some serious pipes.
Ann Wilson can still blow it out now.

Smokey
09-04-2008, 02:42 PM
Pat Benatar was no slouch eaither. That little girl had some serious pipes. Ann Wilson can still blow it out now.

Might as well add Joan Baez to that list also although she like to sing ballads :)