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Robert-The-Rambler
03-14-2007, 01:10 PM
http://img143.imageshack.us/img143/7857/img0075zy6.jpg (http://imageshack.us)

That is what it looks like to me when I'm sitting there posting with you. That 24" monitor is the 2407WFP, just a lovely piece of gear from Dell. I put it on a separate stand with wheels so I can enjoy whatever it may be in a different way than most PC users. Anyhow it is nice to sit on a comfortable couch with 7800 watts of Gandalf New Ageness going. It truly is all about the ambience. I'm sorry if the pics are too high res but I did not know what res I had the camera set at until I posted them at 2048 * 1536. I hope nothing to embarassing shows up in the photos. Now, onto the frontal region.

The most important components are.

The Source: Pioneer VSX-1016 TSV

The Power: 8 Behringer EP2500 amplifiers 450 watts RMS per channel into 8 ohms .1% distortion running in parallel mono powering two speakers for every channel in a 7.1 setup

The Speakers:

Center: Two Sony SS-CN550H

Mains: 4 Sony SS-MF550H

Rears and Surround Back: 4 Sony SS-MF550H and 4 Sony SS-MB150

Subwoofers: 2 Pyle PASW18 18" DJ Subs and 3 Sony SA-WX700 subs with 200 watt min RMS each

Robert-The-Rambler
03-14-2007, 01:23 PM
http://img89.imageshack.us/img89/8093/img0076zz5.jpg (http://imageshack.us)

I apologize for the mess. In that picture you can see my wonderful Hitachi 65" widescreen HDTV. I do love it so much that I will be selling my Sanyo PLV-Z5 and Infocus Screenplay 5000 LCD projectors.

Robert-The-Rambler
03-14-2007, 01:29 PM
http://img142.imageshack.us/img142/2192/img0078nd9.jpg (http://imageshack.us)

You can clearly see the two speaker approach I took for each channel, along my my Dual Disc DVD player, upconverting DVD player, and my Pioneer VSX-1016 TSV.

Robert-The-Rambler
03-14-2007, 01:33 PM
http://img178.imageshack.us/img178/5131/img0079if0.jpg (http://imageshack.us)

More indeed is better and any lack of bottom end is found in a hurry depending on what you are listening to.

Rock789
03-14-2007, 01:39 PM
ok,
due to unscaled photos, this is difficult to see, but do you have the two right channel fronts firing directly into some sort of shelf:confused:

Robert-The-Rambler
03-14-2007, 01:39 PM
http://img142.imageshack.us/img142/4461/img0080uw2.jpg (http://imageshack.us)

The two of them sure look mean but they get a run for there money by the Sony-WX700s. They really just add more volume. The Sony subs do most of the work.

Rock789
03-14-2007, 01:42 PM
dude, check out http://www.webshots.com/

they are free and allow you to post pics like this:
http://thumb2.webshots.net/t/53/153/5/46/69/2796546690043354482CqJVDk_th.jpg (http://rides.webshots.com/photo/2796546690043354482CqJVDk)

Robert-The-Rambler
03-14-2007, 01:46 PM
http://img246.imageshack.us/img246/4605/img0082yi3.jpg (http://imageshack.us)

As you can see there are 4 rears there and also on the opposite side of the room there are also 4 more.

Robert-The-Rambler
03-14-2007, 01:50 PM
http://img292.imageshack.us/img292/9958/img0077ks4.jpg (http://imageshack.us)

They do the job admirably from crisp treble, wonderful pianos, to thunderous bass. I hope that some day all audio enthusiasts can take a chance on the EP2500, one of the best values in audio today. I really need a new amp rack.

audiovideoguy1979
03-14-2007, 02:09 PM
Yes you are correct behringer amps are one of the best values in audio today. You can find people giving them away, because they are a pathetic attempt at an amplifier. Behringer is the pondscum of the pro-audio world. Hate to be rude but you should read a book about sound system design, or at least general accoustics. Look up the words "Lobeing" and "Combing" and see if they mean any thing to you.:confused5:

westcott
03-14-2007, 02:38 PM
Look up the words "Lobeing" and "Combing" and see if they mean any thing to you.:confused5:

Maybe you should go back and visit your kindergarten teacher and have her remind you of the saying, "if you do not have anything nice to say, do not say anything at ALL!"

topspeed
03-14-2007, 03:57 PM
Interesting rig, Rob. Two questions:

1) What's with all the painters tape?
2) Why do have your speakers firing into furniture?

Robert-The-Rambler
03-14-2007, 04:18 PM
Interesting rig, Rob. Two questions:

1) What's with all the painters tape?
2) Why do have your speakers firing into furniture?

1. The tape I used to label the wires when I replaced the Gemini amps I had with these Behringers.

2. I am too lazy to empy the cabinet will all my Xbox games, DVDs, and music CDs. I hate that part of my setup over by the front right channel. I'm going to move that huge contraption over by the beam in the middle of the room. I don't want anything in front of any of the speakers where possible.

Robert-The-Rambler
03-14-2007, 04:20 PM
I'm gonna try to repost the pics at a lower resolution. It is giving me a bit of a headache and my monitor is at 1900 * 1200. Sorry for the oversight.

ruckus1706
03-14-2007, 04:32 PM
You have a ton of Sony speakers...........what is the purpose of having two of everything??? Having two of everything shouldn't make it sound any better......those are Sony speakers.

Robert-The-Rambler
03-14-2007, 04:40 PM
They are now 1280 * 1024. Let me know if you hav any problems.

Robert-The-Rambler
03-14-2007, 04:52 PM
You have a ton of Sony speakers...........what is the purpose of having two of everything??? Having two of everything shouldn't make it sound any better......those are Sony speakers.

I have used only one per channel but did not like the sound as much. With two it justs sounds better. It isn't just about how loud they are. I think of it this way. Lets say you have a choir with only 5 people versus one with ten. I just think that the one with ten would have more of a presence vocally even if all the voices sounded the same. It would just sound like more people were there and it does when you have more speakers with these speakers. Lets say a band has five members and they are all singing in harmony like a song like Seven Bridges Road from the Eagles. Would you not want to have 5 speakers in the front soundstage to accomodate their voices? I don't know. More speakers and the seeming appearance of more voices creates a more "live" sound.

L.J.
03-14-2007, 05:11 PM
WOW!

You wouldn't be related to Brainstorm by any chance, would you :ciappa:

westcott
03-14-2007, 05:21 PM
You have a ton of Sony speakers...........what is the purpose of having two of everything??? Having two of everything shouldn't make it sound any better......those are Sony speakers.

More speakers produce more dB, everything else being equal.

Dusty Chalk
03-14-2007, 05:37 PM
2) Why do have your speakers firing into furniture?Yeah, I noticed that too. I know I'm not supposed to say anything, but you have some serious placement issues.

Oh, and where are the wavy lines? I expect to see some heat haze above the amps.

Robert-The-Rambler
03-14-2007, 05:45 PM
Yeah, I noticed that too. I know I'm not supposed to say anything, but you have some serious placement issues.

Oh, and where are the wavy lines? I expect to see some heat haze above the amps.

Well, my vacation starts in a couple weeks so I'll move the stupid cabinet ASAP. Any other suggestions are welcome, love it, hate it, or whatever else. <>___<>

If you put your face in front of the amps you get a steady cool breeze. Its some cooling solution they got going in there. These speakers probably don't even warm up the amplifiers.

emorphien
03-14-2007, 06:32 PM
WOW!

You wouldn't be related to Brainstorm by any chance, would you :ciappa:
:lol:

Well some people benefit from having bad hearing, but I don't get why they feel need to buy more of the garbage when it doesn't do them any good.

Dusty Chalk
03-14-2007, 09:55 PM
Well, my vacation starts in a couple weeks so I'll move the stupid cabinet ASAP. Well, it's not just the cabinet, but that's the most glaring error, and would be a good start.

PeruvianSkies
03-14-2007, 10:14 PM
It appears that you are a big fan of multiple speakers, which to each his own. Personally I would rather have fewer great speakers than alot of decent speakers in my setup. It doesn't seem like the room you have is fitting for that many speakers as the pictures would suggest that the room is not really that big and for all those speakers there must be some bleeding over and/or cancelling out. However, cleaning it up, room calibration, and getting some room treatments would certainly help matters.

westcott
03-15-2007, 03:48 AM
:lol:

Well some people benefit from having bad hearing, but I don't get why they feel need to buy more of the garbage when it doesn't do them any good.

Everyone has to start somewhere and if you boys would "holster your guns", maybe he will stick around long enough to actually learn something. But, if you keep at it, all he will do is leave the audio review forum with a bad taste in his mouth.

If you boys would show a little diplomacy, this site will grow and everybody wins.

powerlord
03-15-2007, 05:45 AM
Yes you are correct behringer amps are one of the best values in audio today. You can find people giving them away, because they are a pathetic attempt at an amplifier. Behringer is the pondscum of the pro-audio world. Hate to be rude but you should read a book about sound system design, or at least general accoustics. Look up the words "Lobeing" and "Combing" and see if they mean any thing to you.:confused5:

I don't know about these amps here but I do know a little about Behringer,I'm a musician and have played all brands of amps, there are alot of people out there that have no hands on knowledge that knock this brand because it isn't Marshall(which I think is the worst tube amp made) or it isn't Mesa,one of the best combo's i've played is a solid state behringer,it drove a 412 cab with ease and sounded great,you could get any tone out of it and clean channel was,well,pretty clean.For the price, they offer a pretty good amp.I'm sure these aren't Luxman or Tosh,or Parasound quality,but who knows,they might serve well.

Tarheel_
03-15-2007, 08:37 AM
i'm sure it sounds wonderful, but i suggest you invest or build a nice equiqment rack/cabinet. This would free up space around your room, help organize the wiring/cables and move the distracting Pioneer from below your TV.

Other than organizing all the components, its looks like you have the system you want. Enjoy!

hydroman
03-15-2007, 12:19 PM
^ditto all previous comments, and... since it is a drop ceiling (or appears to be one) couldn't you hide the wiring really easily? It is shame all the amps wouldn't fit in the rack - that would look tremendous.

Welcome to the Madness!

SAEA501
03-15-2007, 12:23 PM
Robert: You do have quite a bit of equipment in a small room. But you seem off to a good start.

So.......audiovideoguy....you're pretty good at kicking people in the cajones, especially for your first post. Maybe you could look up lobing. Might even learn how to spell it.

L.J.
03-15-2007, 02:19 PM
All joking aside, the only thing that matters is that you enjoy your system. Like I said, I used to own those speakers and they are what they are. I was happy with them but did not realize what I was missing until I upgraded.

If you're interested in organizing/hiding your cables, this (http://cableorganizer.com/wire-management/) link may be useful.

Robert-The-Rambler
03-15-2007, 06:42 PM
:lol:

Well some people benefit from having bad hearing, but I don't get why they feel need to buy more of the garbage when it doesn't do them any good.

I love it. Tell me how you realy feel. <>__<>

Robert-The-Rambler
03-15-2007, 06:46 PM
Everyone has to start somewhere and if you boys would "holster your guns", maybe he will stick around long enough to actually learn something. But, if you keep at it, all he will do is leave the audio review forum with a bad taste in his mouth.

If you boys would show a little diplomacy, this site will grow and everybody wins.

My skin is thick. I can take it.

Robert-The-Rambler
03-15-2007, 06:51 PM
i'm sure it sounds wonderful, but i suggest you invest or build a nice equiqment rack/cabinet. This would free up space around your room, help organize the wiring/cables and move the distracting Pioneer from below your TV.

Other than organizing all the components, its looks like you have the system you want. Enjoy!

I want to get one that can accommodate 12 amps or other devices. I may yet see another spot I may be able to mount more speakers. It would also be a good idea to put the Pioneer near the amps and out of the way but that also complicates the audio wires to the DVD players. I'll see what I can come up with. Thanks everybody for the advice.

Robert-The-Rambler
03-15-2007, 06:54 PM
^ditto all previous comments, and... since it is a drop ceiling (or appears to be one) couldn't you hide the wiring really easily? It is shame all the amps wouldn't fit in the rack - that would look tremendous.

Welcome to the Madness!

I will make it happen. I always say I'm going to clean up the theater. This time I will do it. This I vow. Appearance does matter.

P.S Wow, this Galdalf music is quite inspiring.

Robert-The-Rambler
03-15-2007, 07:02 PM
I don't know about these amps here but I do know a little about Behringer,I'm a musician and have played all brands of amps, there are alot of people out there that have no hands on knowledge that knock this brand because it isn't Marshall(which I think is the worst tube amp made) or it isn't Mesa,one of the best combo's i've played is a solid state behringer,it drove a 412 cab with ease and sounded great,you could get any tone out of it and clean channel was,well,pretty clean.For the price, they offer a pretty good amp.I'm sure these aren't Luxman or Tosh,or Parasound quality,but who knows,they might serve well.

Somebody else out there could confirm what I am experiencing in a home theater environment with these amps. Thanks for your insight.

Robert-The-Rambler
03-15-2007, 07:04 PM
All joking aside, the only thing that matters is that you enjoy your system. Like I said, I used to own those speakers and they are what they are. I was happy with them but did not realize what I was missing until I upgraded.

If you're interested in organizing/hiding your cables, this (http://cableorganizer.com/wire-management/) link may be useful.

I do. I really do, LJ.

Robert-The-Rambler
03-15-2007, 07:07 PM
It appears that you are a big fan of multiple speakers, which to each his own. Personally I would rather have fewer great speakers than alot of decent speakers in my setup. It doesn't seem like the room you have is fitting for that many speakers as the pictures would suggest that the room is not really that big and for all those speakers there must be some bleeding over and/or cancelling out. However, cleaning it up, room calibration, and getting some room treatments would certainly help matters.

What are room treatments? Can you give me some examples?

PeruvianSkies
03-15-2007, 09:09 PM
What are room treatments? Can you give me some examples?

Room treatment typically and most commonly refers to methods of helping the acoustics of your room with the aid of various things, usually that are placed on the floors, walls, ceilings, or other critical areas in order to help the sound within a space. Most houses are not built for good acoustics, unlike a concert hall. So we are usually working with square or rectangular shaped rooms with 'dead' spots and other problem areas, which can be helped with certain treatments that are sold by various companies. Sometimes you can get away with using common house-objects to help matters, but it's good to get professional stuff if you can afford to. House-hold items would include carpeting/rugs, tapestries on the wall or other sound-absoring material to minimized the amount of sound bouncing. Others on this site could probably recommend some of their room treatment methods.

westcott
03-16-2007, 03:30 AM
What are room treatments? Can you give me some examples?

Here is a link that will get you started. It covers a lot more than bass traps and acoustic panelling, but I would suggest starting with proper speaker placement and go from there. If your speakers are too close to walls or if you are sitting in a null, treatments are not going to solve all your problems.

Acoustic Prinicpals (http://www.audioholics.com/education/acoustics-principles/)

White Papers - CRC studies (http://www.harman.com/about_harman/technology_leadership.aspx)

Most speakers are direct radiating speakers. They use a driver that disperses sound from three or more drivers. A tweeter, a mid range, and woofer. The tweeter and the midrange disperse sound in a 180 degree radius from the front of the speaker (this is not completely accurate but it will do for now). The woofer handles low frequencies but low frequencies are dispersed in a 360 degree pattern "around" the speaker, or omnidirectional. All of the frequencies will bounce when they come in contact with a surface. The harder the surface, the more that is reflected. The closer to a wall, the more that will be reflected.

Why is this a big deal? The reflected sound does not arrive at the ear at the same time (we will skip phase and amplitude for now) and this causes delays and a scrambling, if you will, of the original sound. This can cause a speaker to sound boomy (more like a car stereo which is a confined space with LOTS of reflections), muddy (frequencies interfering with the original material, coloring the sound), and time issues (what seem like echos or a lip sync kind of affect). Speaker port direction is a myth. It is the omnidirectional qualities of bass frequencies that require us to pull speakers away from the walls, not which way the port faces on a speaker cabinet. All speakers need to be pulled away from the walls to avoid having the bass frequencies wreak havoc on the rest of the frequency range.

So, in a perfect world, you have a rectangular room. Square rooms are a problem. In this rectangular room, you will want your speakers to be on the short wall. You will want to sit two/thirds back from the front wall. Ideally, your front speakers should be 1/3 into the room. The speakers should be as far away from the side walls as one can tolerate without loosing the stereo effect and collapsing the sound stage (like a concert, you still want to hear the keyboard on the left, the vocals in the middle, and the guitar player on the right, for example). Now all of these things are either not practical or possible, but it is a good reference for what one is trying to achieve. Also, the front channels should be as close to ear level as possible so as sound pans from left to right (a train or car, for example) it sounds like the car is passing from left to right and not down the hill and up again (center channel too low) and so early reflections from the floor or ceiling are less influential.

Of all the walls in a room, the human ear is most attuned to sounds reflecting from the floor. This is because, all our lives, it is one of the few constants in sound, no matter where we go. Rarely are we not walking on solid ground, inside or outside. For simplicity, it is our point of reference for all other sounds. That is why I stress the use of speaker stands and properly placing the center channel up off the floor and as close to ear level as possible. There are programs for free that you can plug in your room dimensions and it will tell you what frequencies that will tend to overlap with one another. These overlaps, or room modes, are just like two people talking at the same time with the same content. They may be saying the same words at the same volume, but when spoken at the same time, produce a cancellation effect and/or a pitch of their own.

This is where room treatments come into play. Not every room is a perfect rectangle or have the perfect materials to absorb and deflect sound so acoustic treatments are used. Since bass frequencies are the biggest problem (who really has the room to put their front speakers 1/3 of the way into the room), bass traps are the number one recommendation to start off room treatments. Bass traps are usually placed in the corners of the room, to start with since this is where bass frequencies are amplified the most (why is for acoustics 202). That is why old school always suggested subwoofer placement in the corner of the room to get maximum dB from your subwoofer. But, as I pointed out earlier, bass is not our best friend and if overamplified, it will obscure the sound coming from the rest of the frequency range.

The next area to tackle is the primary reflections that occur on the floor, ceiling, and side walls. The link I gave you tells you how to locate them using a mirror. Once located, sound absorbers or diffusers are recommended in these locations, normally starting with the side walls.

I have rambled long enough and I am sure I have ruffled the subwoofer crowds feathers already but I thought this could be useful to someone and maybe peak their interest. Now, there are different speaker designs like horns and planars and coincident and ribbons and etc. that do not all conform to these "generalizations" but almost all of them are affected by bass and that is the biggest culprit that interferes with the original sound produced by a speaker cabinet.

So, you can see why I am not a fan of in wall speakers unless the significant other demands them. You are placing a driver in the exact place you do NOT want to place a speaker.

I did not cover the ultimate goal of having a flat frequency response over the entire speaker range in detail, but it is important and a simple SPL meter from Radio Shack will help you determine where your peaks and valleys are and provide a way of determining if your speaker placement is optimal.

Dusty Chalk
03-16-2007, 03:36 AM
That second link didn't work, I don't think -- what did you search on?
Speaker port direction is a myth. It is the omnidirectional qualities of bass frequencies that require us to pull speakers away from the walls, not which way the port faces on a speaker cabinet. All speakers need to be pulled away from the walls to avoid having the bass frequencies wreak havoc on the rest of the frequency range.I think I just had an epiphany. Thanks for posting that, that was very intuitive.
So, you can see why I am not a fan of in wall speakers unless the significant other demands them. You are placing a driver in the exact place you do NOT want to place a speaker.No, I'm not sure I see. The problem with frequencies -- any of them, bass or otherwise -- is interaction of the original frequency with reflections. By placing the drivers in the wall, there is only direct-radiated sound (well, I'm assuming an infinite baffle here, which isn't the case, it's an overgeneralization). The problem only shows up when you have the drivers close to the wall, and you have those short reflections cancelling themselves out.

spf
03-16-2007, 05:35 AM
Holy smokes, that kind of speaker setup in a room that small must really pressurize the room. Do you find that it gets a bit stuffy with all the gear running in there?

Shane

Rich-n-Texas
03-16-2007, 06:27 AM
My skin is thick. I can take it.

I'm glad you said that. :smilewinkgrin:

The only thing I can speak to, since I'm not familiar with your equipment... dude, you really need to invest in some more sq. ft.

topspeed
03-16-2007, 08:07 AM
Speaker port direction is a myth. It is the omnidirectional qualities of bass frequencies that require us to pull speakers away from the walls, not which way the port faces on a speaker cabinet. All speakers need to be pulled away from the walls to avoid having the bass frequencies wreak havoc on the rest of the frequency range Not necessarily. Bookshelf speakers with rear ports that are actually placed in an enclosed book shelf can suffer from chuffing and port noise. At high excursion levels, the air simply has nowhere to go. I understand your argument, but the location of the port can absolutely matter depending on the installation parameters.

Rock789
03-16-2007, 09:53 AM
Not necessarily. Bookshelf speakers with rear ports that are actually placed in an enclosed book shelf can suffer from chuffing and port noise. At high excursion levels, the air simply has nowhere to go. I understand your argument, but the location of the port can absolutely matter depending on the installation parameters.
what are typical clearance requirements for a port?

Brainstorm
03-17-2007, 06:58 AM
Nice assembly of amplification affordability bares a new meaning with Behringer EP2500. I would have thought you would have opted for the active crossover for the fronts with matching loudspeakers.

You might want to look at the (behringer Ultradrive Pro DCX2496 Ultra High-Precision Speaker Management System) there is dbx 4800 version that is installed at the Empire Leicester square screen #1. Now unless you have £3k $3k for each dbx 4800 which is why Behringer have there own affordable version. Youíll need quite a few these make it all work.

http://i174.photobucket.com/albums/w118/Brainstorm3417/DCX2496-large.jpg

Iím thinking of buy my first one sometime around next month for £168.99 UK!

westcott
03-17-2007, 08:29 AM
Not necessarily. Bookshelf speakers with rear ports that are actually placed in an enclosed book shelf can suffer from chuffing and port noise. At high excursion levels, the air simply has nowhere to go. I understand your argument, but the location of the port can absolutely matter depending on the installation parameters.

I agree with you totally. I guess I should have been more specific. Just like walls, enclosures, cabinets, AV stands and credenzas are all the speakers enemy and can amplify the bass problems I alluded to just like walls and any distortion being produced by a speaker, including port chuffing. If you are using a bookshelf speaker, I still recommend placing them away from the walls and on a stand instead of on a bookshelf that is usually enclosed on three or more sides. If this is not possible, a shelf that is not enclosed is better compromise. If you are placing a speaker so close to the wall that you are interfering with the ability of air to move freely in and out of the porting, you are not adhering to my earlier recommendations anyway.

Dusty,

I am going to let you read through all the articles I provided and then try to clarify anything you do not understand. One, they do a much better job than I at explaining acoustics and second, I think it would be more fruitful for both of us if we let you do a little homework on your own first. I will give you a hint though. Resonances!

N. Abstentia
03-17-2007, 06:29 PM
I'm speechless.

8000 watts, 27 speakers, 60 square feet, 1 electrical outlet.
Hanging speaker wire from the ceiling is a nice touch.

Robert-The-Rambler
03-17-2007, 06:41 PM
I'm speechless.

4000 watts, 27 speakers, 60 square feet. Hanging speaker wire from the ceiling is a nice touch.

That's actually 7800 watts soon to become closer to 9000 watts, 21 speakers, in a room that is not a rectangle so dimensions are a bit hard to quantify but it boils down to about 20 * 12 in most of the area except for the closet that was added near the front portion of the setup and the alcove that leads to the garage. Anyhow, there you have it. The changes I make will be revealed at a later time. <>__<>

Robert-The-Rambler
03-17-2007, 06:43 PM
I'm speechless.

8000 watts, 27 speakers, 60 square feet, 1 electrical outlet.
Hanging speaker wire from the ceiling is a nice touch.

It is not one outlet. Are you mad? <>__<> Not even I am crazy enough to do that. It is separated over FOUR outlets.

Robert-The-Rambler
03-17-2007, 06:49 PM
Nice assembly of amplification affordability bares a new meaning with Behringer EP2500. I would have thought you would have opted for the active crossover for the fronts with matching loudspeakers.

You might want to look at the (behringer Ultradrive Pro DCX2496 Ultra High-Precision Speaker Management System) there is dbx 4800 version that is installed at the Empire Leicester square screen #1. Now unless you have £3k $3k for each dbx 4800 which is why Behringer have there own affordable version. Youíll need quite a few these make it all work.

http://i174.photobucket.com/albums/w118/Brainstorm3417/DCX2496-large.jpg

Iím thinking of buy my first one sometime around next month for £168.99 UK!

I don't think I really need much else when it comes to processing. The MCACC auto calibration does so well for equalization that I'm not even going to bother tweeking anything on my own. I'll just screw it up. Although, thanks for the recommendation. That's what I buy a receiver for.

Rich-n-Texas
03-17-2007, 07:00 PM
I think the MCACC is now in a straight jacket and on its way to Happy Acres! ;)

Thanks,
Rich

N. Abstentia
03-17-2007, 08:04 PM
It is not one outlet. Are you mad? <>__<> Not even I am crazy enough to do that. It is separated over FOUR outlets.

My God. Do you have the fire department on speed dial?

PeruvianSkies
03-17-2007, 08:16 PM
When I bought my last few Pioneer receivers I thought that the MCACC was a brilliant idea and used it on a regular basis to get the room to sound good. However, I realized upon more careful examination that it's more often than not...dead wrong. While this is a great tool to get things 'about' right, you really need to use your own ear to really get it fine tuned. I've noticed that it's easier to do it in a few quick steps...

First, select your speaker size.
Second, choose speaker distance and make sure that your left and right are balanced as well as your rear right and left.
Third, match speaker level to your listening position.
Fourth, EQ based on your left and right, this is usually where the "auto" version goofs up.
Fifth, play a few selections you are familar to get things fine tuned.

Robert-The-Rambler
03-17-2007, 08:47 PM
When I bought my last few Pioneer receivers I thought that the MCACC was a brilliant idea and used it on a regular basis to get the room to sound good. However, I realized upon more careful examination that it's more often than not...dead wrong. While this is a great tool to get things 'about' right, you really need to use your own ear to really get it fine tuned. I've noticed that it's easier to do it in a few quick steps...

First, select your speaker size.
Second, choose speaker distance and make sure that your left and right are balanced as well as your rear right and left.
Third, match speaker level to your listening position.
Fourth, EQ based on your left and right, this is usually where the "auto" version goofs up.
Fifth, play a few selections you are familar to get things fine tuned.

I should have been more clear about that. So I adjust the sub and all volume setting based on what the Auto EQ comes up with. With this last running of the Auto EQ it seems to be doing great. In fact I am a little worried about running it again but now since I have all equal amplfliers and the speakers are acoustically matched I have a little less too worry about. I do have it set to all channels independently set.

I have everything set to large and the subwoofer to plus. That offers a very natural sound. If I set to small it just gets a bit wierd on the upper end. 450 watts is not ideal for blasting just a midrange and tweeter. It is piercing if you get carried away with it. Setting to small can also give too much signal to the sub channel, too. It is all about balance. Thanks so much for your response. I really need to get back to setting up my "new" amplifier rack. I actually bought a $40 plastic storage rack at Home Depot that claims it can hold up to 750lbs. We shall see. Its roomy and easy to run wires to.

Robert-The-Rambler
03-17-2007, 08:49 PM
My God. Do you have the fire department on speed dial?

You should never up the wattage without protection.

PeruvianSkies
03-17-2007, 08:52 PM
You should never up the wattage without protection.

Surge protection has absolutely nothing to do with overloading a socket with too much juice. It would appear based on your setup and your comments that you are a bit confused on several things. I am not trying to be mean in spirit, but hopefully we can all help you get on track.

Robert-The-Rambler
03-18-2007, 04:13 PM
Surge protection has absolutely nothing to do with overloading a socket with too much juice. It would appear based on your setup and your comments that you are a bit confused on several things. I am not trying to be mean in spirit, but hopefully we can all help you get on track.

Anyhow, having it separated over several power outlets has been doing the trick. I focused too much on the corny joke than whether it made any sense. I've never blown a fuse so I think I'm doing okay. I don't think the current draw is near as high as Behringer puts the EP2500 at 9.6 amps. I don't think they mention at what point that was measured.

paulspencer
12-11-2009, 07:34 AM
I can't believe you have 8 of them!!! I bought one to drive some power hungry subs but when I upgraded my subs I used the amp to drive my mains. Turns out they do it very well, even though they are a whole lot more amp than I need.

Ultradrive which was mentioned by Brainstorm is very different to what you find in your receiver. It would allow you to make your own active speakers without needing to design a passive crossover, or being locked in to the design. Not a bad idea if that is your kind of thing.

rob_a
12-11-2009, 02:59 PM
Well, my vacation starts in a couple weeks so I'll move the stupid cabinet ASAP. Any other suggestions are welcome, love it, hate it, or whatever else. <>___<>

If you put your face in front of the amps you get a steady cool breeze. Its some cooling solution they got going in there. These speakers probably don't even warm up the amplifiers.

Sorry this trip to AR was a bit of a kick in the face. just keep in mind that most of the people here are mid age, a little over weight and have stopped asking the mrs. for any ;).

audio amateur
12-11-2009, 03:27 PM
2 year old thread...

JoeE SP9
12-11-2009, 03:41 PM
Sorry this trip to AR was a bit of a kick in the face. just keep in mind that most of the people here are mid age, a little over weight and have stopped asking the mrs. for any ;).

Please speak for yourself about gettin' any. I'm 62 and I try to get some everyday. I succeed about half the time. So, life's not too bad at least half the time!:prrr:

BadAssJazz
12-11-2009, 04:44 PM
My eyes!, My eyes! God please!!! Make it stop, make it stop!!!

Some threads are better left dead.

frenchmon
12-11-2009, 05:14 PM
Boy that was to funny.

frenchmon

Sir Terrence the Terrible
12-12-2009, 02:05 PM
Boy that was to funny.

frenchmon

I don't think even the worst horror movie frightened me as much as this set up did! Oooo!

rob_a
12-14-2009, 12:34 PM
2 year old thread...

OHH, I see :D who would bring this back to life???

Robert-The-Rambler
12-14-2009, 04:08 PM
I have changed the setup a bit these days scaling back to just 5 EP2500s and using less speakers but the song remains the same as is the intent. I love it loud and clear. Unfortunately with work and life in general I haven't been able to use the gear as much as I would like but hey I have no reservations about saying that I can play John Denver louder than anybody in the neighborhood.

Anyhow, looking back the room really was like a mad science lab. It still needs work but I will say that it is not going to be as messy next time I post pics. I still stand by the assertion that high power DJ gear can turn something mediocre like my speakers into something less mediocre with the help of a quality component like a receiver.

Perhaps much like this thread my love of movies/music with be revived as well.

Rich-n-Texas
12-16-2009, 01:22 PM
So two whole days have gone by and no one has welcomed R-t-R back.

Welcome back Robert. Would love to see more pics but I don't know if this site has the bandwidth for pictures much larger than say... a thumbnail. Who knows though.

Robert-The-Rambler
12-16-2009, 07:41 PM
So two whole days have gone by and no one has welcomed R-t-R back.

Welcome back Robert. Would love to see more pics but I don't know if this site has the bandwidth for pictures much larger than say... a thumbnail. Who knows though.

I have another setup composed of some of my older gear that some might say is a lot better than the newer stuff. Thanks for the welcome. My bedroom is a whole different story, too... <>__<>