• 07-31-2009, 06:00 PM
    atomicAdam
    What is this thing? Easy to replace?
    Hey All, need your opinions, educated guesses, or just straight up 'i know what that was'.

    Just flipped on my Golden Tube SE-40 amp and about second after or so I heard, wifie did too, a POP that was about as loud as one of those small 'blackcat' fireworks.

    I saw just the hint of a flash and wifie seems to think it came from one of the tubes.

    I let the amp warm up still, didn't smell anything, sound still coming out of both speakers and sounds normal. Highs are there, mids, and lows, all there.

    What could/should/ it have been. All tubes seem to be heating up and glowing, no burnt smell. Did I get a lucky break or did something go wrong and I just can't tell. And if that is the case, what does that really say about the amp? yikes!

    Anyways, opine on this for me please.

    Thanks
    -adam

    PS, it is Friday night so I hope you all are having a good one or a stiff drink and awesome tunes.
  • 08-01-2009, 07:57 AM
    E-Stat
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by atomicAdam
    Just flipped on my Golden Tube SE-40 amp and about second after or so I heard, wifie did too, a POP that was about as loud as one of those small 'blackcat' fireworks.

    That's usually the sound of a bias resistor in its death throes when a tube goes supernova. I suspect you'll need to replace the tube and its associated resistor. Open the case and look for a severed lead on one of the larger resistors. Is it really playing at full level? If so, that is rather unusual.

    I had a 6550 go supernova on me about six months ago. My amps have B+ fusing, however, which eliminates the drama.

    rw
  • 08-01-2009, 09:17 AM
    atomicAdam
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by E-Stat
    Is it really playing at full level? If so, that is rather unusual.

    rw

    One of the tubes on the unit did come to me a little jacked up. It crackled a lot and had been having issues. But lately it has been fine.

    If you mean full level like volume full level, it appears fine. Stereo seems to be just where it was. Maybe it is missing something though. Didn't sounds like it last night though.

    I'm going to let it run a few hours today.
  • 08-02-2009, 06:28 PM
    atomicAdam
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by E-Stat
    That's usually the sound of a bias resistor in its death throes when a tube goes supernova. I suspect you'll need to replace the tube and its associated resistor. Open the case and look for a severed lead on one of the larger resistors. Is it really playing at full level? If so, that is rather unusual.

    I had a 6550 go supernova on me about six months ago. My amps have B+ fusing, however, which eliminates the drama.

    rw

    Hey E-Stat -

    You think that a blown bias resistor could cause the amp to sound thinner? Today I've been listening to some tunes for the past couple hours and I've noticed the body sounds a bit thinner and I've feel like the highs are starting to irritate my ears.

    And it seems there isn't a punch any longer, with or without the sub being on.
  • 08-03-2009, 06:04 AM
    bfalls
    I can't imagine a resistor going without a smell. I've rarely heard one "pop". Usually they just sit there heat and burn up.

    When you said "pop" the first thing Ithat came to mind was capacitor. Usually when a capacitor goes it doesn't smell, but can pop and flash. I've seen large electrolitic caps, or rather heard them fail as they heated, bloated and released internal gas/oil depending on their design. Some have pop-off type release plugs which release the pressure rather than exploding.

    It may still be a bias resistor, but without the smell I doubt it. I would look for a bloated can-type capacitor.
  • 08-03-2009, 10:18 AM
    atomicAdam
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by bfalls
    When you said "pop" the first thing Ithat came to mind was capacitor. Usually when a capacitor goes it doesn't smell, but can pop and flash. I've seen large electrolitic caps, or rather heard them fail as they heated, bloated and released internal gas/oil depending on their design. Some have pop-off type release plugs which release the pressure rather than exploding.

    Could that cause some frequencies to drop out, or boost others?
  • 08-03-2009, 06:58 PM
    atomicAdam
    1 Attachment(s)
    Ok....
    Ok, so what the heck is this?

    Good thing the board was mounted upside down so when this blew all the stuff inside went down into the case instead of the board. smart!

    Anyways, I figure, take board off, pull off thing, replace?

    Help?
  • 08-04-2009, 05:22 AM
    bfalls
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by atomicAdam
    Ok, so what the heck is this?

    Good thing the board was mounted upside down so when this blew all the stuff inside went down into the case instead of the board. smart!

    Anyways, I figure, take board off, pull off thing, replace?

    Help?

    That, my friend is an electrolytic capacitor. There should be a capacitance and voltage reading on the side as well as polarity for the leads. Should be a simple replacement. The funny thing about caps is they can fail on their own. Usually if it's a resistor or other component, their failure is a result of something else in the circuit. So replacing the capacitor should fix your problem.

    I've saved myself a sh*tload of money over the years repairing my own electronics. Usually the problem is obvious and several times it's been a capacitor. Good luck with the repair.
  • 08-04-2009, 06:56 AM
    atomicAdam
    Cool thanks.

    I'll go ahead and try do some web research on how to replace.

    Since I am replacing 1 should I just replace all at this time or just find the match a replace.
  • 08-04-2009, 08:23 AM
    bfalls
    You should only need to replace the one component. The failed component doesn't necessarily put a strain on associated components, so "shotgun" repair methodology isn't needed.

    Once the board is out, there should be only two leads to desolder before removing the cap. Be sure to respect the correct polarity when replacing. If you look at the cap in the foreground you'll see a white vertical band. I believe this shows the negative leg. The board should display the correct polarities on the board, but don't depend on it. Note the polarity before you remove the failed part.
  • 08-04-2009, 03:02 PM
    basite
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by atomicAdam
    Cool thanks.

    I'll go ahead and try do some web research on how to replace.

    Since I am replacing 1 should I just replace all at this time or just find the match a replace.


    check partsexpress.com, but I think mouser is a safer bet.

    Be sure to get an exact replacement (preferably even from the same brand).

    http://www.mouser.com/

    Keep them spinning,
    Bert.
  • 08-04-2009, 04:09 PM
    E-Stat
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by basite
    check partsexpress.com, but I think mouser is a safer bet.

    You're aware of Mouser? Kewl. That's the only place where I found the replacements for the computer grade Mallory caps used in my '81 Threshold.

    rw
  • 08-05-2009, 06:00 PM
    atomicAdam
    4 Attachment(s)
    I need help finding something - a google search and the web sites provided didn't seem to have the parts.

    From what I can tell the manufacturer is IC and I need a 33uF 350v capacitor but I can't seem to find one online. If IC is the manufacturer, do I or rather should I use the same manufacturer for the replacement rather than just a diff one with the same specs?

    Here are some images.

    Thanks
  • 08-05-2009, 06:05 PM
    Luvin Da Blues
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by atomicAdam
    I need help finding something - a google search and the web sites provided didn't seem to have the parts.

    From what I can tell the manufacturer is IC and I need a 33uF 350v capacitor but I can't seem to find one online. If IC is the manufacturer, do I or rather should I use the same manufacturer for the replacement rather than just a diff one with the same specs?

    Those should be a stock item at your local electronics jobber. Certainly ask for higher grade replacement caps if you can swing it. Cheers
  • 08-05-2009, 06:21 PM
    E-Stat
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by atomicAdam
    From what I can tell the manufacturer is IC and I need a 33uF 350v capacitor but I can't seem to find one online. If IC is the manufacturer, do I or rather should I use the same manufacturer for the replacement rather than just a diff one with the same specs?

    Never heard of them before. OTOH, Nichicon is a prominent capacitor supplier. Here is their equivalent. Given they are cheap and shipping would likely be more than the parts cost, I might purchase several.

    rw
  • 08-05-2009, 06:28 PM
    atomicAdam
    Thanks for the help.

    Well it appears there are four in the set this one blew in. Should I just replace them all or replacement of one from one company and the others from another wont effect sound?

    Ideas, or maybe it wouldn't matter too much on an amp of this quality?
  • 08-05-2009, 06:30 PM
    Luvin Da Blues
    I'm thinking it's a generic cap and the IC stands for "integrated circuit", referring to the leads configuration (ie; mounting).
  • 08-06-2009, 01:08 AM
    basite
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Luvin Da Blues
    I'm thinking it's a generic cap and the IC stands for "integrated circuit", referring to the leads configuration (ie; mounting).


    nope, just did some research and found this:

    http://www.illinoiscapacitor.com/

    they appear to be in business for over 50 years, and are supposed to be a big bang for the buck...

    nevertheless, before finding that out 5 minutes ago, I never heard from them...

    Keep them spinning,
    Bert.
  • 08-06-2009, 05:44 AM
    atomicAdam
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by basite
    nope, just did some research and found this:

    http://www.illinoiscapacitor.com/

    they appear to be in business for over 50 years, and are supposed to be a big bang for the buck...

    nevertheless, before finding that out 5 minutes ago, I never heard from them...

    Keep them spinning,
    Bert.


    You are awesome - thanks - they have what I need!
  • 08-06-2009, 06:43 AM
    Feanor
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by basite
    nope, just did some research and found this:

    http://www.illinoiscapacitor.com/
    ...

    Bert.

    OK, great, Bert. So it looks like aA's exact replacement would be in THIS range, (note the "CKHM" descriptor) -- but I'm not sure I'm reading the voltage correctly: is it 50V or 350V?:
    • If 50V (mostl likely), propably THIS capacitor,
    • But if 350V, the probably THIS.
    If it isn't clear from the markings, then go by size: the higher voltage is much larger and might not even fit.

    Don't forget to observer the polarity when you make swap, (otherwise your problems could get much worse).
  • 08-06-2009, 07:10 AM
    atomicAdam
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Feanor
    OK, great, Bert. So it looks like aA's exact replacement would be in THIS range, (note the "CKHM" descriptor) -- but I'm not sure I'm reading the voltage correctly: is it 50V or 350V?:
    • If 50V (mostl likely), propably THIS capacitor,
    • But if 350V, the probably THIS.
    If it isn't clear from the markings, then go by size: the higher voltage is much larger and might not even fit.

    Don't forget to observer the polarity when you make swap, (otherwise your problems could get much worse).


    That is the one I was looking at this morning - Thank folks for helping. Now time to research some videos on how to replace a cap and go from there.

    -adam

    Oh Feanor, it is 350v, just hard to see in the photos.
  • 08-19-2009, 08:17 PM
    atomicAdam
    thank all for you help.

    i got the amp fixed. i called up IC - they said they didn't have a 350v version but had 400v they could sell. it was advised by another person to replace all the caps with 375v or 400v caps to reduce the chance of it blowing again.

    so i did. first time ever doing anything like this. it seems to have worked smoothly, no mess, i didn't get burned or set anything on fire. so i'd say success.

    amp didn't blow when i turned it on and played for a couple hours.

    sound almost seems better now actually, but i could be just so happy to have fixed it myself and not have to run off my cheap solid state harsh sounded Onkyo M282.

    i have to say I am so happy I took a photo of all the wires going to where with my phone. that was a big help in making sure everything was back in place.

    i think next project, replace the 'neon green' power on light with something orange. but...

    thanks again.

    -adam
  • 08-21-2009, 09:57 AM
    RGA
    Hahaha - now your ready to build an audio note kit amplifier :-)

    There are many cap upgrades you can make and plenty of articles about them - they do actually matter! I mean people really do take their caps soooo seriously it's rather "out there" for most people - http://www.vhaudio.com/21capacitorshootout.pdf
  • 08-21-2009, 11:38 AM
    bfalls
    RGA I noticed the link on your response. Have you reviewed any of the Legacy speakers? I have a pair of the pre-20/20 Focus configured in "Purist form" without the contour switches. I also have the matching Sliver screen center.
  • 08-21-2009, 03:48 PM
    RGA
    No I am new to reviewing and was in China teaching this past year (though I have a review being edited currently). I have only auditioned Legacy Whisper and not enough to be able to review it. I do not review home theater systems.